Jordan, Iraq sign agreement to connect grids

Project to enhance stability of power networks

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. A chimney billows smoke behind electricity wires in central Beijing December 21, 2009. British Environment Minister Ed Miliband has accused China, Sudan, Bolivia and other left-wing Latin American nations of having tried to hijack the U.N. climate summit to stop a deal, London's Guardian newspaper reported on Monday. The summit in Copenhagen ended with a bare-minimum agreement on Saturday when delegates "noted" an accord struck by the United States, China and other emerging powers that fell far short of original goals. REUTERS/David Gray

Image used for illustrative purpose. A chimney billows smoke behind electricity wires in central Beijing December 21, 2009. British Environment Minister Ed Miliband has accused China, Sudan, Bolivia and other left-wing Latin American nations of having tried to hijack the U.N. climate summit to stop a deal, London's Guardian newspaper reported on Monday. The summit in Copenhagen ended with a bare-minimum agreement on Saturday when delegates "noted" an accord struck by the United States, China and other emerging powers that fell far short of original goals. REUTERS/David Gray

REUTERS/David Gray

AMMAN — Jordan and Iraq on Sunday signed a contract to connect the electric power grids of the two countries and sell electricity mutually, according to an Energy Ministry statement.

Under the agreement, signed during a videoconference, Jordan, after the completion of the electric linkage project, provides Iraq with 1,000 gigawatt hours per year in the first phase of the project, to be followed by a second phase that allows for the two sides to increase the power exchange capacity.

Energy Minister Hala Zawati and her Iraqi counterpart Majed Emarah attended the signing ceremony, while Director General of the National Electric Power Company (NEPCO) Amjad Rawashdeh and Iraqi General Manager of the General Company for Electric Power Transmission/Central Region Barak Saad Nur signed the agreement.

Zawati, in her remarks, highlighted the importance of the Jordanian-Iraqi power grid connection, pointing out that the project enhances the stability and reliability of electricity networks in both countries, as well as serves the intention of establishing a joint power market in the Arab world, which would promote Arab economic integration.

Highlighting the importance of the move, Zawati said that the agreement is in line with the 2020-2030 comprehensive strategy for the energy sector, entailing that Jordan should be a regional hub for the exchange of energy in all its forms, especially after signing the Jordanian-Saudi power grid connection agreement.

Rawashdeh said that the new agreement, after the completion of the linkage between the two countries in its first phase, which needs about 26 months, allows NEPCO to export electricity, adding that the project will reduce the capital costs required to invest in the power generating plants and raise the capacity of the existing plants, which serves the interests of the two countries, as well as paves the way for additional connections with other countries.

Supplying Iraq with electricity will begin after the completion of the construction of the new Al Risha plant in Jordan, and the establishment of the 300-km power line connecting Al Risha station with Al Qaim conversion plant in Iraq, to be completed within 26 months after the date of the contract, the statement added.

© Copyright The Jordan Times. All rights reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).

Disclaimer: The content of this article is syndicated or provided to this website from an external third party provider. We are not responsible for, and do not control, such external websites, entities, applications or media publishers. The body of the text is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis and has not been edited in any way. Neither we nor our affiliates guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views or opinions expressed in this article. Read our full disclaimer policy here.

More From Energy