Saudi customs chiefs urge travelers to declare goods worth more than $800

The requirement is part of the common customs law system for the GCC countries

  
A Saudi woman walks with her luggage as she arrives at King Fahd International Airport in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, August 5, 2019. Image used for illustrative purpose.

A Saudi woman walks with her luggage as she arrives at King Fahd International Airport in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, August 5, 2019. Image used for illustrative purpose.

REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed

RIYADH: The Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority has called on travelers coming to Saudi Arabia to declare purchases or gifts worth more than SR3,000 ($800) or its equivalent in foreign currencies.

The requirement is part of the common customs law system for the GCC countries, Al Watan reported.

The Authority also called on travelers coming to or departing from the Kingdom to declare currencies, jewelry, or valuable materials worth SR60,000 or more or the equivalent in foreign currencies, or any goods prohibited or restricted in the Kingdom, including cigarette and tobacco products.

The process can be completed electronically through the “Travelers’ Declaration” application or the website of the Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority ( http://www.customs.gov.sa ).

It warned that fines would be imposed on declaration dodgers.

Travelers are liable to pay 25 percent of the value of seized items in fines, rising to 50 percent of the value for repeat offenders where there is no suspicion that the seizures are related to a crime or a money-laundering offense.

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