‘Saudi Arabia to increase global coral reefs by 10%’

The ambition of the Saudi G20 presidency is to not only seek to conserve the reefs we have but to actually increase the extent of coral reefs globally by maybe 10%: Prof. Carlos M. Duarte

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. Natalie Friere, a diving and snorkelling guide, swims through a natural archway in an area called the 'Coral Gardens' located at Lady Elliot Island and 80 kilometers north-east from the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 10, 2015. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkeled on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor". Picture taken June 10, 2015. REUTERS/David Gray - RTX1IFE1

Image used for illustrative purpose. Natalie Friere, a diving and snorkelling guide, swims through a natural archway in an area called the 'Coral Gardens' located at Lady Elliot Island and 80 kilometers north-east from the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 10, 2015. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkeled on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor". Picture taken June 10, 2015. REUTERS/David Gray - RTX1IFE1

David Gray - RTX1IFE1
RIYADH — Prof. Carlos M. Duarte, a professor in marine science at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) held a media briefing during the summit week of the Saudi G20 presidency to talk on the theme “Securing a Future for the World’s Coral Reefs” in the G20 International Media Center in Riyadh.

Professor Duarte highlighted the need for international collaboration as key, as no single nation has the capacity to reverse the threat to coral reefs alone.

Professor Duarte said: "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is committed to the conservation of coral reefs in the Red Sea and keen to share the lessons that it has learned with the rest of the world but we can't do that alone.

"We need a global partnership to accelerate our speedy progress to conserve coral reefs and ensure that our children and grandchildren will continue to enjoy healthy reefs in the Red Sea and elsewhere.

“Red Sea coral reefs are the best preserved in the world and remarkably beautiful.”

Professor Duarte added that by the turn of the century, about half of the coral reefs were lost.

“We should not accept the loss of the coral reefs and grieve, but there is a need to act and strengthen cooperation to preserve them, not only through green recovery plan but blue recovery initiatives as well.”

"So the ambition of the Saudi G20 presidency is to not only seek to conserve the reefs we have but to actually increase the extent of coral reefs globally by maybe 10 percent," he asserted.

 
© Copyright 2020 The Saudi Gazette. All Rights Reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).
 
Disclaimer: The content of this article is syndicated or provided to this website from an external third party provider. We are not responsible for, and do not control, such external websites, entities, applications or media publishers. The body of the text is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis and has not been edited in any way. Neither we nor our affiliates guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views or opinions expressed in this article. Read our full disclaimer policy here.

More From Life