Jordan received 253,600 barrels of Iraqi crude oil in September

The Jordan Petroleum Refinery in Zarqa received some 2.958 million barrels between the end of August of 2019 and the end of September of 2020

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. Used oil barrels are seen outside a garage in Cuevas del Becerro, near Malaga, southern Spain February 16, 2015.

Image used for illustrative purpose. Used oil barrels are seen outside a garage in Cuevas del Becerro, near Malaga, southern Spain February 16, 2015.

REUTERS/Jon Nazca

AMMAN — The Kingdom received some 253,600 barrels of Iraqi oil during September of 2020, at an average of 8,560 barrels per day, Minister of Energy in the caretaker government Hala Zawati said on Thursday.

In a statement to the Jordan News Agency, Petra, Zawati said that Iraqi oil tankers unload crude oil into Jordanian tankers at the border between the two countries, in line with the government’s precautionary measures to halt the spread of the novel coronavirus, noting that a total of 857 Jordanian tankers have participated in the process.

She added that the Jordan Petroleum Refinery in Zarqa received some 2.958 million barrels between the end of August of 2019 and the end of September of 2020, at an average of 7,545 barrels per day, via 11,152 Jordanian and Iraqi tankers.

The import of Iraqi oil comes within the framework of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed between the two countries, under which Jordan buys Iraqi crude oil (Kirkuk crude oil) at an average of 10,000 barrels per day to meet part of its annual needs.

Iraqi crude oil is sold to Jordan on the basis of the average monthly price of Brent crude, from which the difference in transport costs and the difference in specifications are deducted.

Iraq has approved a plan to provide Jordan with 10,000 barrels of oil daily from Baiji in Iraq to the Jordan Petroleum Refinery Company via tankers. Under the MoU, the oil will cover 7 per cent of the Kingdom’s daily demand.

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