Sterling dips below $1.40 on U.S. Fed hawkish surprise

The pound fell 0.7% versus the dollar in late trading on Thursday after the move, taking it below $1.40 for the first time since early May

  
British Pound Sterling banknotes are seen in a counter machine at the Money Service Austria company's headquarters in Vienna, Austria, November 16, 2017. Image used for illustrative purpose.

British Pound Sterling banknotes are seen in a counter machine at the Money Service Austria company's headquarters in Vienna, Austria, November 16, 2017. Image used for illustrative purpose.

REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

LONDON - Sterling fell below $1.40 against a strengthening dollar on Thursday after the U.S. Federal Reserve surprised markets by signalling it would raise interest rates and end emergency bond-buying sooner than expected.

U.S. central bank officials moved on Wednesday their first projected rate increases from 2024 into 2023, signalling the United States will begin closing the door on its pandemic-driven monetary policy sooner than previously thought. 

The move pushed U.S. Treasury yields higher, while equities fell. 

The pound fell 0.3% versus the dollar to $1.3941 at 1353 GMT on Thursday, after diving 0.7% in the previous session, taking cable below $1.40 for the first time since early May. 

"There has been no fundamental developments overnight driving the pound; rather, selling pressure seems to reflect the broader strength in the USD," said Shaun Osborne, chief FX strategist at Scotiabank.

The news of the rapid spread of the Delta COVID-19 variant in the UK weighed marginally on sentiment, he added.

Against the euro, the pound was up 0.2% on the day, hitting 85.63 pence per euro, after jumping to its highest level of 85.42 pence since early April in earlier trade. 

Lee Hardman, currency economist at MUFG, said sterling's strength versus the euro reflected bets that the Bank of England could follow the Fed's lead and tighten policy faster than the euro zone.

"It's a reflection of the view that the BoE is likely to be one of the first central banks to raise rates as well. If the Fed is willing that could give the BoE confidence to move earlier," Hardman said.

Currency markets are fully pricing in a 25 basis point hike in rates by the BoE by December 2022. 

In the meantime, data on Wednesday showed inflation in Britain unexpectedly jumped above the central bank's 2% target in May.

(Reporting by Joice Alves and Iain Withers, additional reporting by Saikat Chatterjee. Editing by Gareth Jones) ((Joice.Alves@thomsonreuters.com))


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