10 people allowed to sit at one table in restaurants and cafes: Saudi official

The ministry emphasized that the entry to restaurants and cafes will be restricted only for those whose health status on the Tawakkalna application is immune by receiving two doses of vaccine against coronavirus, the ministry said

  
People sit at David Burke's restaurant, in The Zone restaurant complex, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia August 25, 2021. Image used for illustrative purpose.

People sit at David Burke's restaurant, in The Zone restaurant complex, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia August 25, 2021. Image used for illustrative purpose.

REUTERS/Ahmed Yosri

RIYADH The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs and Housing announced its decision to increase the number of people who are allowed to sit at one table in restaurants and cafes to 10 from Monday onwards.

The ministry emphasized that the entry to restaurants and cafes will be restricted only for those whose health status on the Tawakkalna application is immune by receiving two doses of vaccine against coronavirus, the ministry said.

It stressed the need to ensure that all precautionary measures and preventive protocols against coronavirus are complied with, as specified by the Public Health Authority (Weqaya).

It is noteworthy that Saudi Arabia had suspended all indoor dining at restaurants and cafes on April 26, 2020 as part of measures to curb the spread of coronavirus.

However, restaurants and cafes were allowed to reopen after one month and that was under strict coronavirus preventive protocols, including limiting the maximum number of people who can sit at a table to five people unless they are members of one family.

The protocols also included checking temperature of customers; 1.5 meter physical distance between two customers and serving food in disposable items such as paper or plastic cups and dishes as well as using electronic food menus.

 

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