UAE lifts ban on poultry meat, eggs from the Netherlands

The Ministry of Climate Change and Environment issued a statement.

  
Image used for illustrative purposes. A chicken is seen at a poultry market in the northeastern Indian city of Siliguri July 25, 2007.

Image used for illustrative purposes. A chicken is seen at a poultry market in the northeastern Indian city of Siliguri July 25, 2007.

REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

The Ministry of Climate Change and Environment has just issued a statement informing the public that thermally untreated products of birds (including their meat and eggs) from the Netherlands are no longer banned in the UAE.

Earlier this year in January, based on a notification from the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) of the outbreak of a highly pathogenic strain of bird flu, H5N8, in the Flevoland province of the Netherlands that led to destroying more than 150,000 chickens, the UAE Ministry of Climate Change and Environment (MOCCAE) had announced that it had taken the following precautionary measures:

1. Banned the import of all species of domestic and wild live birds, ornamental birds, chicks, hatching eggs and their non-heat-treated by-products from the Netherlands.

2. Banned the import of poultry meat and non-heat-treated products and table eggs from the Flevoland province.

3. However, thermally treated poultry products (meat and eggs) from all parts of the Netherlands have been cleared for import.

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