Saudi Public Prosecution: Up to 15 years in jail, steep fines for facilitating entry of infiltrators

The jail term will be for a period of no less than five years and not more than 15 years

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. Close-Up Of Gavel And Hammer On Desk

Image used for illustrative purpose. Close-Up Of Gavel And Hammer On Desk

Getty Images/Audtakorn Sutarmjam / EyeEm

RIYADH The Public Prosecution has warned that hefty penalties including jail and fines will be awarded to those who facilitate entry of any infiltrators into the Kingdom. The penalties included maximum jail term of 15 years and fine up to SR1 million.

The Public Prosecution said that the violations include facilitating the entry of infiltrators into Saudi Arabia, providing them transportation, shelter or any kinds of assistance or services.

The jail term will be for a period of no less than five years and not more than 15 years.

The penalties also include confiscation of the means of transportation and the residence that was specially prepared to shelter the infiltrator or used for this purpose only.

If the means of transportation or residence belongs to others, the violator will be slapped with a fine of up to SR1 million.

If the violator who provided transportation or accommodation for the infiltrator is a man of good faith and the crime was committed out of his gross negligence, then the maximum fine will be SR500,000.

The court ruling against the violator will be published in the media at the expense of the convicted person and this will be after issuance of the final verdict.

The Public Prosecution also confirmed that the aforementioned criminal offenses are major crimes requiring arrest, and crimes against honor and trust.

The Public Prosecution would undertake the investigation and prosecution of the aforementioned crimes in accordance with the provisions of a royal decree issued on March 11 this year, it said in a statement.

 

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