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|08 January, 2019

Saudi Arabia's Al-Baha coast gets tourism green light

The spring festival includes entertainment and shopping activities, an exhibition for government departments with pavilions showcasing the province’s heritage

Image used for illustrative purpose. Dancers perform at the opening ceremony of the Rabih Alriyadh Festival (Riyadh Spring Festival) in Riyadh March 21, 2012.

Image used for illustrative purpose. Dancers perform at the opening ceremony of the Rabih Alriyadh Festival (Riyadh Spring Festival) in Riyadh March 21, 2012.

REUTERS/Fahad Shadeed

JEDDAH: The people of As-Sarah, a mountainous area in Saudi Arabia’s southwestern Al-Baha region, are increasingly turning to the coastal Tihama strip to enjoy its warm climate and abundant natural attractions.

Recent heavy rain has left Tihama, a narrow strip between the Red Sea and nearby mountains, covered in verdant foliage, heightening its appeal for the Al-Baha Spring Festival being held in Al-Mikhwah governorate.

Tihama’s four governorates, Al-Mikhwah, Qilwah, Hijrah and Ghamid Al-Zinad, are preparing parks and tourist sites to receive visitors, and are organizing a variety of spring events.

The spring festival includes entertainment and shopping activities, an exhibition for government departments with pavilions showcasing the province’s heritage, a lighting and sound hall, a zoo and illuminated corridors, as well as cultural events in an open air theater.

Tihama’s diverse climate is a major attraction for visitors. Its varied landscapes in the four governorates include lush valleys and plains stretching along the Red Sea coast and west to the Sarawat range and Shada Mountain.

The tree-lined valleys include Wadi Ileeb, 10 km from Hijrah, and Wadi Al-Khitan at the bottom of Akabat Al-Abnaa, south of Baljurashi.

Tihama is also home to archaeological sites, such as Thee Ain village, built on top of a mountain of white marble and surrounded by several farms irrigated by the village’s spring.

The villages of Khalaf and Al-Khulaif, about 5 km from the northern governorate of Qilwah, house Islamic inscriptions dating back hundreds of years.

Tihama is also known for its traditional restaurants with popular dishes, such as porridge, broth, Mandi, Mazbi and barbecues.

Al-Bahah Gov. Prince Hossam bin Saud bin Abdul Aziz has directed authorities in Tihama’s governorates to prepare tourist attractions and picnic areas, and provide essential needs for visitors.

He has also told security authorities to strengthen their presence in parks and tourist sites, and to improve traffic flow for tourists.

Arab News: Copyright: Arab News © 2017 All rights reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. ( www.Syndigate.info ).

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