|21 August, 2019

How tourism trails are reviving Egyptian heritage

Egyptian adventurer Omar Samra, who helped design the first trail in the Sinai Peninsula

The group Gouna Mountain Goats is seen on their way to climb and explore Egypt's undiscovered mountain trails in Wadi Billi, at El-Gouna near the Red Sea, Egypt November 14, 2018. Picture taken November 14, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

The group Gouna Mountain Goats is seen on their way to climb and explore Egypt's undiscovered mountain trails in Wadi Billi, at El-Gouna near the Red Sea, Egypt November 14, 2018. Picture taken November 14, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Tourism trails are offering travellers the opportunity to explore the cultural richness of Egypt by allowing them to follow the footsteps of the ancient Egyptians.

British explorer Ben Hoffler, who was responsible for creating the first long-distance trail in mainland Egypt five years ago, shows off the route to the Red Sea Mountains on CNN’s Travel Trends: Egypt.

Known as an ancient heritage site for numerous ancient Egyptian civilisations, Hoffler said that the main challenge is translating the route for modern times whilst not compromising their cultural importance.

Speaking about designing a modern-day trail that complements its ancient heritage, Hoffler said: “The Red Sea Mountains have always been a really key area for Egypt. Many civilisations came here, and they made ways through these mountains. From the pharaohs to the Ptolemies to the Romans to the civilizations that followed. What we did with the Red Sea Mountain Trail was identify all of these old routes, and then we had to think about how we can put these together in a way that creates a hiking route for modern times."

Egyptian adventurer Omar Samra, who helped design the first trail in the Sinai Peninsula several years before, also joined Hoffler on the journey.

Samra said: "Developing trails for tourism is something that is now a trend and it's growing very, very fast. But having people that have lived in this land for hundreds of years, adds another completely different aspect to this experience,”

Samra hopes this new route will both create a unique experience for visitors and a micro-economy for the local people.

The ancient network of trade, travel and hunting routes are owned by the Bedouin people, and when fully complete, the trail will consist of a 10-day cultural immersion into the ancient traditions of one of Egypt’s largest tribes.

Copyright 2019 Al Hilal Publishing and Marketing Group Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).

Disclaimer: The content of this article is syndicated or provided to this website from an external third party provider. We are not responsible for, and do not control, such external websites, entities, applications or media publishers. The body of the text is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis and has not been edited in any way. Neither we nor our affiliates guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views or opinions expressed in this article. Read our full disclaimer policy here.