Saudi Arabia forecasts 2000 jobs for women engineers in next 3 years

The Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI) predicted availability of at least 2,000 jobs for Saudi women engineers in the next three years.

  
07 September 2016
RIYADH: The Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI) predicted availability of at least 2,000 jobs for Saudi women engineers in the next three years.

Engr. Talal Samarqandi, vice president at the Jeddah JCCI's consulting office, said these women engineers will have a salary of SR7,000.

He said the number of engineers in the Kingdom at present ranges from 2,000 to 3,000 as a result of the increase of 5 to 8 percent in the electricity, decoration, architecture and programming sectors.

He said that the women's engineering offices in the Kingdom operate at a high level, adding that the engineering profession was not new to women, and noted the emergence of women engineers in Riyadh and Jeddah.

He noted, however, that there are disciplines in which women are not inclined, like civil engineering.

"There are specializations available to them at universities such as electrical and computer engineering, design and interior decoration, among others," he said.

He added that while they had good academic training at universities, they need intensive training in the local labor market for at least one year to gain experience.

Samarqandi pointed out that the engineering sector in the Kingdom needs over the next 35 years about 400 percent of the current number of local engineers.

He pointed out that at present, the present number stands at 30,000 compared to the 200,000 foreign engineers.

He added that the Kingdom is also in need of technicians to work as assistants to young men and women who have trained or graduated from institutes in the fields of carpentry, painting, among others.

He also said that there's a need to open more colleges and institutes for technicians or assistant engineers so that they could contribute to the creation of national expertise.

© Arab News 2016


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