|20 July, 2019

90% of Kuwaiti graduates prefer government jobs

22 thousand graduates annually look for an opening in the government sector

Image used for illustrative purpose. Cropped shot of an unrecognizable businessman dressed in Islamic traditional clothing working in his office.

Image used for illustrative purpose. Cropped shot of an unrecognizable businessman dressed in Islamic traditional clothing working in his office.

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KUWAIT CITY More than 90 percent of the graduates prefer employment in the government which increases the government burdens. The first part of the state budget is allocated to salaries and wages and despite plans to encourage Kuwaitis to join the private sector, figures and statistics reveal the low employment of Kuwaitis in non-governmental organizations, reports Al-Qabas daily.

Kuwaiti youth are reluctant to a very high extent to be employed in some professions and jobs while the government remains the most secure and preferred employer.

The latest statistics revealed that 22 thousand graduates annually look for an opening in the government sector and the number will continue to rise unless the government develops a new employment policy taking into account the needs of the labor market on the one hand and the outputs of academic institutions on the other.

According to statistics, the Civil Service Commission employs about 12 thousand annually, while the military, oil, judicial and other sectors are considered incubators for another group of graduates.

The Kuwait University and the Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET) are the two largest institutions providing the labor market with the graduates in various fields of specializations and degrees, with about 19,000 graduates annually, with an average of 7,000 graduates from the university and 12,000 from the authority.

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