September witnesses relative ‘stability’ in Coronavirus infections in Kuwait

Total deaths in September, it decreased by 6%, compared to August

  
KUWAIT CITY: The month of September witnessed relative stability in the total cases of infection, recovery and death due to new corona epidemic in Kuwait compared to August, where the number of infections were high, reports Al-Rai daily. Professor of Informatics Sciences at the Kuwait University, Dr Jihad Al-Dalal, speaking about the epidemic situation in Kuwait, said the recovery cases rose slightly in September by 1 percent, compared to August, and put the number of recovery in September at 19,464 cases, which is equivalent to 20 percent of the total cases of recovery since the start of the epidemic.

As for the total deaths in September, it decreased by 6 percent, compared to August. He put the number of deaths in September at 79, which is equivalent to 13 percent of the total deaths since the start of the epidemic until the end of September. This number of deaths in September was the lowest compared four months prior to it.

The epidemic prevalence coefficient, R0 (R0, pronounced “R naught,” is a mathematical term that indicates how contagious an infectious disease is. It’s also referred to as the reproduction number), witnessed daily fluctuation around the value of 1.0, indicating that the spread of the epidemic is in a relatively stable state, without any significant decrease or increase in the spread. As for the number of intensive care cases in early October, they increased significantly by 54%, compared to the number in early September.

Distribution

Regarding the distribution of cases in health areas in September, the Hawalli Health District was the most affected area, as the number of infections during September was 25 percent of the total infections for the month, followed by the Ahmadi Health District with 23 percent, Capital with 19 percent, Al-Jahra was the least affected area with 15 percent of the total injuries.

Al-Farwaniya, Al-Ahmadi and Al-Jahra witnessed a decrease in the total number of injections in September compared to August, while the total number of infections increased in both Hawalli and the Capital in September compared to August.

As was the case at the beginning of September, Kuwait also ranked third in the Gulf in early October in the ratio of the number of injuries to the population, while Qatar and Bahrain came in the first and second places respectively in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries in the ratio of the number of infections to the population. As for the total number of cure recovery cases until the beginning of October, Kuwait witnessed a slight increase and made progress in the Gulf ranking.

Kuwait at the beginning of October ranked third in the Gulf with a recovery rate of 92 percent after it was ranked fifth in the Gulf in early September when the recovery rate read 90.5 percent. At the beginning of October, Qatar ranked first in the Gulf, with a recovery rate of 97.6%. As for the deaths ratio, Kuwait came in third place after Saudi Arabia and Oman as the largest country in the Gulf Cooperation Council in the death rate.

In view of the significant increase again in the number of infections in many countries of the world, the acceleration for the return to normal life and the increase in gatherings increases the fear of recording high number of infections again in Kuwait, and therefore it is necessary to point out the importance of individual responsibility in adhering to health requirements for physical and social distancing and wearing of face masks to reduce the number of infections.

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