Saudi Arabia mulls exporting power to neighboring countries

“Projects are ongoing to connect power grids with Jordan, Egypt, Iraq, and the GCC,” the Saudi energy minister said

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. A general view of power plant number 10 at Saudi Electricity Company's Central Operation Area, south of Riyadh.

Image used for illustrative purpose. A general view of power plant number 10 at Saudi Electricity Company's Central Operation Area, south of Riyadh.

REUTERS/Fahad Shadeed
 

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia will start exporting electricity to neighboring countries, Argaam reported citing the Kingdom’s energy minister, following the opening of the Sakaka IPP photovoltaic (PV) power plant, its first renewable energy project.

“Projects are ongoing to connect power grids with Jordan, Egypt, Iraq, and the GCC,” Prince Abulaziz bin Salman said.

Gulf states have been exploring the idea of opening up their grids to allow them to export power within the region and even beyond to Europe. Such a move allows for the possibility of exporting electricity during periods of lower demand such as during the Gulf's winter months when demand is low.

These low demand months in the region coincide with higher demand months in Europe when people use more power to heat their homes.

The minister said Saudi leadership, particularly Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is closely monitoring developments in the Kingdom’s energy sector, including renewables.

His comments come just after the crown prince inaugurated the Sakaka IPP IV plant on Thursday.

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