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|23 September, 2018

Laying foundation stone for Oman Sugar Refining Plant in Sohar Port

The construction cost of the plant is estimated at $350mln

Image used for illustrative purpose. Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files

Image used for illustrative purpose. Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files

REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files

Suhar: The foundation stone of Oman Sugar Refining Plant was laid down today at Sohar Port under the auspices of Dr Ali bin Masoud al Sunaidy, Minister of Commerce and Industry, in the presence of Shaikh Muhanna bin Saif al Lamki, Governor of North Al Batinah, a number of undersecretaries and a group of businessmen.

The construction cost of the plant is estimated at US $350 million on 188,000 square meters with a production capacity of one million tonnes annually according to the highest international standards.

It will be equipped with European production lines and will operate according to the latest technologies available in the field of high quality refined sugar production to be distributed locally, regionally and globally.

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The factory also provides employment opportunities for Omani youth, with the Omanisation rate starting at 30 per cent to reach 90 per cent over the next ten years.

In a speech toMark Geilenkirchen, theCEO of Sohar Port, in which he talked about the port management strategy in enhancing the presence of food industries in the free zone and attracting many investments fromthe public and private sectors in projects related to food industries.

Nasser al Hosani, General Manager of Oman Sugar Refining Company said that the plant is the first of its kind in the Sultanate and will provide many opportunities for other industries in the port and the free zone while enhancing the levels of food security in the Sultanate, adding that they will seek to find employment opportunities to citizens and promote sustainable growth of the country’s economy. –ONA

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