PROJECTS: Averda opens The Red Sea Project's 'zero waste to landfill' facility

TRSDC to utilise sustainable waste management system for construction phase

  
Image used for illustrative purposes, belts transport plastic through the Closed Loop recycling plant in Dagenham east London February 17, 2009. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

Image used for illustrative purposes, belts transport plastic through the Closed Loop recycling plant in Dagenham east London February 17, 2009. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

REUTERS/Luke MacGregor
Averda announce on Tuesday the formal opening of the integrated and environment-friendly waste management facility for The Red Sea Project, Saudi Arabia's multi-billion luxury tourism development under Vision 2030.
 
The international waste and recycling company said in a statement that the new facility is designed to handle all forms of waste generated during the construction of ‘Phase 1 of the giga-project which has set an ambitious goal of ‘zero waste to landfill’.  
 
Phase 1 will see the construction of 16 luxury hotels across five islands and two inland resorts, providing more than 3,000 hotel rooms.
 
The Red Sea Project will also include a new international airport, a yacht marina, leisure and lifestyle facilities, as well as supporting logistics and utilities infrastructure, including more than 80km of new roads.
 
Averda said all forms of waste generated by the project have been considered in the design of the waste system. The tonnes of rubble, rock and concrete generated by the construction of the foundations, buildings and infrastructure would be sorted and treated by special machinery which transforms them into smaller particles. These are then being reused for other purposes, such as aggregate for building roads.
 
The household waste generated by the workforce employed to construct the first phase would be collected through dedicated recycling bins to segregate waste, with recyclable glass, plastics, cans, paper being collected separately. These materials are then checked again before being baled and transferred to Saudi recyclers to be made into new products.  
 
Food and organic waste will be turned into compost, providing nutrient-rich material for the dedicated million-square metre landscape nursery built for the project, completed last year. The facility will eventually provide over 15 million plants required to landscape the destination.  
 
Averda said that the tiny proportion of non-recyclable, non-compostable materials remaining after these processes would be incinerated in special, environmentally sensitive facilities, the particles and carbon generated would be captured and the resulting ash used for the manufacture of bricks.
 

Ian Williamson, Chief Projects Delivery Officer of The Red Sea Development Company (TRSDC), joined Malek Sukkar, CEO of Averda, formally opened the 'zero waste to landfill' for The Red Sea project.

Averda’s CEO Malek Sukkar said the project would be a guide and benchmark for future development in Saudi Arabia and beyond.
 
Ian Williamson, Chief Projects Delivery Officer of The Red Sea Development Company commended Averda for building and delivering the facility on time and on budget despite Covid-19.
 
"In my 40-year career, it’s the first time I’ve seen a facility of this magnitude built at the outset of construction. The facility allows us to facilitate waste segregation at every one of the construction sites across the development, followed by the collection and then repurposing and recycling of the waste by Averda’s team," he said.
 
(Writing by Syed Ameen Kader; Editing by Anoop Menon)

Disclaimer: This article is provided for informational purposes only. The content does not provide tax, legal or investment advice or opinion regarding the suitability, value or profitability of any particular security, portfolio or investment strategy. Read our full disclaimer policy here.

© ZAWYA 2021