UAE: Three months jail for giving false testimony

UAE Public Prosecution posts Twitter message, outlining penalties for giving false testimony

  
An auctioneer's gavel is seen prior to the home auction for a four-bedroom house at 230 Blacktown Road on February 14, 2015 in Blacktown, Australia. Image used for illustrative purpose.

An auctioneer's gavel is seen prior to the home auction for a four-bedroom house at 230 Blacktown Road on February 14, 2015 in Blacktown, Australia. Image used for illustrative purpose.

Getty Images/Mark Metcalfe

UAE - People found giving false testimony to mislead justice will henceforth be sentenced to detention for at least three months, the UAE Public Prosecution has warned.

The authority posted a message on Twitter, outlining penalties for giving false testimony with the intent of misleading justice.

As per Article 253 of the Federal Penal Code, whosoever gives false testimony “shall be sentenced to detention for a term less than (3) three months, whoever gives a false testimony before a judicial authority or an organisation having jurisdiction to hear witness after oath, denies the truth, or keeps silent about all or part of the relevant facts of the case known to him, regardless of whether the witness is admitted to testify or not, and of whether his testimony was accepted or not in such proceedings. Should he perpetrate such act during the investigation of a felony or trial thereof, he shall be sentenced to term imprisonment. In case the false testimony leads to death sentence or life imprisonment, the author thereof shall be sentenced to the same penalty.

The tweet is part of a social media campaign to spread awareness among the public about the law.

 

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