UAE Golden Jubilee: Motorists will be fined for not following car decoration guidelines

Abu Dhabi urge residents to decorate their cars with appropriate decals from November 28 to December 6

  
Image used for illustrative purpose. View on the busy Zayed the 1st Street in downtown Abu Dhabi with the landmarks Etisalat Head Office building and the newly constructed Central Market Towers on the left.

Image used for illustrative purpose. View on the busy Zayed the 1st Street in downtown Abu Dhabi with the landmarks Etisalat Head Office building and the newly constructed Central Market Towers on the left.

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UAE - Motorists in Abu Dhabi have been told to stick to the December 6 deadline for decorating their vehicles during the UAE's 50th National Day celebrations.

According to a statement issued by the Abu Dhabi Police on Sunday, motorists can decorate their cars with appropriate decals from November 28 to December 6.

"Drivers who do not comply with the specified time frames will be fined," police warned in the statement.

According to the specifications set out by the force, car decorations must not obstruct the vision of the driver in any form.

The police also specified not to install flagpoles on vehicles, not to blur or cover number plates on the car, and not to change the vehicle's original paint colour.

Police said drivers and passengers should not use confetti sprays, and not overcrowd vehicles.

People have also been warned against sticking their bodies out of windows, or riding on top of vehicle roofs and drivers are also expected not to leave their vehicles.

According to police, the use of camels and horses on public roads is also prohibited.

Police called on the public not to throw waste items, not to leave skid marks on roads, and not to obstruct the flow of traffic and designated taxi and bus stands.

Pedestrians have been urged to use designated crossings to ensure their safety.

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