|03 July, 2019

Kuwait's Sheikh Jaber Bridge project, a gateway towards the future: report

Sheikh Jaber Bridge would link Kuwait City to the future Silk Road project, which, in turn, would be a significant development landmark in the region.

Image used for illustrative purpose. Vehicles travel on the First Ring Road in Kuwait City November 10, 2012.

Image used for illustrative purpose. Vehicles travel on the First Ring Road in Kuwait City November 10, 2012.

REUTERS/Stephanie Mcgehee

The bridge, which is considered the world's fourth longest bridge, would positively affect several Arab countries, primarily Iraq and Syria.

Generally speaking, a bridge cannot only act as a geographical connection but also a link for development, welfare and prosperity. The Sheikh Jaber Bridge would link Kuwait City to the future Silk Road project, which, in turn, would be a significant development landmark in the region. In May, Kuwait inaugurated the Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad Project, one of the country's massive projects going down in history as the fourth longest bridge worldwide, used as part of Kuwait's 2035 vision of a residential and investment boom in the northern region.

Sheikh Jaber Bridge shortens the distance between Kuwait City and Subiya area, initially driving 104 kilometres in 90 minutes, to a shortcut of about 37.5 kilometres in less than 30 minutes. The bridge starts from the intersection of Al-Ghazali Highway with Jamal Abdel Nasser Street at the port of Shuwaikh to Al-Subiya Highway ending at the new Al-Subiya City at northern Al-Joun. Construction works started on 3rd November, 2013 and were divided into two parts: the first one (Al-Subiya link) cost KD738 million (approximately US$2.4 billion), covering a low 27-kilometre height bridge, with the main bridge for ships passing to Al-Doha port, across a shipping lane passage that is 120 metres wide, a navigational opening that is 23 metres high.

The second part includes a 4.7 kilometre long Doha highway, with five 725-metre high bridges and a 7.7-kilometre-long sea bridge, three traffic lanes and a safety lane in each direction costing KD165.7 million (about US$ 544 million). The sea bridge starts from the port of Shuwaikh to the west and passes beside Umm Al-Namel Island to Doha area and then connects to the Doha Highway.

The bridge was built with over 1,500 pillars, a width of about three metres and some of them with a depth of 72 metres at the sea bottom, and the height of the sea is between 9-23 metres.

The project contains the construction of two artificial islands, the first near Kuwait City and the second near the town of Subiya to provide maintenance, emergency services and coast guards patrolling the bay leading to the coast of a length of six kilometres. Environmentally aware, the utmost structural techniques are applied in order to protect the marine environment in compliance with the standards and regulations implemented studiously by Kuwait's Environment Public Authority.

© Copyright Emirates News Agency (WAM) 2019.