Macau junket Suncity gives rare details VIP finances in rebuttal of online criticism

Suncity has never received any requests from mainland or overseas authorities demanding customer information and, contrary to online speculation

  
A logo of Macau junket operator Suncity Group is seen at a gaming fair in Macau, China November 18, 2015.

A logo of Macau junket operator Suncity Group is seen at a gaming fair in Macau, China November 18, 2015.

Reuters/Bobby Yip

HONG KONG - Macau's biggest junket operator Suncity, which operates VIP gambling rooms across Asia, has given rare insight into its balance sheet during a rebuttal of online criticism, saying it is financially robust and not the target of law enforcement.

In a seven-minute video released on Sunday, Suncity founder Alvin Chau rejected social media posts that appeared in recent days alleging the firm was unable to cover customers' financial deposits and that mainland Chinese authorities had information about its VIP customers.

Chau said the VIP club's total fiscal reserves stood at HK$10.58 billion ($1.37 billion) while cash flow used in daily operations was HK$18.6 billion. The group additionally has HK$16.5 billion in two Macau banks, he said.

"We have the capability and enough capital to offset any bad debts and chip deposits of all clients. I would like to reiterate that Suncity is a very stable financial platform."

As Chau spoke, the video showed images of letters dated July and bearing Suncity's name beneath the letterheads of two of China's biggest banks.

Suncity has never received any requests from mainland or overseas authorities demanding customer information and, contrary to online speculation, there has been no leak of any data, he said.

"Suncity has completely abided by the law in operating tourism and gaming businesses in Macau," Chau said, adding that no employees are stationed in or participate in any gaming related businesses in the mainland.

Casino gambling is illegal in China outside Macau's special administrative region.

Last July, Suncity was singled out by state-backed Chinese media which attacked online gaming activities for causing what it described as great harm to China's social economic order. Suncity last year said it did not operate any online gaming.

Suncity's publicly listed entity in Hong Kong, Suncity Group Holdings Ltd, does not include its junket operations. Junket operators are go-betweens who bring high rollers to play at casinos, extending them credit and collecting on their debts.

Chau also denied speculation that Suncity was subsidising Hong Kong "rioters" with the group having "wholehearted devotion to the motherland".

($1 = 7.7507 Hong Kong dollars)

(Reporting by Farah Master; Editing by Christopher Cushing) ((farah.master@thomsonreuters.com; +852 3462 7709;))

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